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Author Archives: Suvodip Chakraborty

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Control Room Decision-Making Lab at Singapore-ETH Centre

We are happy to announce the starting of our new Control Room Decision-Making Lab at the Singapore-ETH Centre (SEC) for our project on Communicating Predicted Disruptions in Future Resilient Systems (FRS 2). The lab is equipped with sensors for measuring decision makers’ psycho-physiological state, including remote and head-mounted eye trackers, galvanic skin response sensors, and accelerometers. The new lab infrastructure will be used to study how different communication techniques can be used in control rooms to support decision-makers. This research will improve the next generation of control rooms, thus enhancing the resilience of the monitored infrastructure in case of disruptions

We want to thank all our collaborators and the SEC management for their help setting up the laboratory.

Control Room Decision-Making Lab


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Workshop Paper presented at the INTERACT 2021

Our paper “Improving resilience by communicating predicted disruptions in control rooms” has been presented at the INTERACT 2021 Workshop on Control Rooms in Safety Critical Contexts (CRiSCC): Design, Engineering and Evaluation Issues. The full-day workshop was held in a hybrid manner at Bari, Italy, with 13 interdisciplinary researchers. The vision paper outlines some of the ideas and challenges which we are addressing in the FRS 2 project on “Optimizing strategies for communicating predicted disruptions to stakeholders”:

Chakraborty, S., Kiefer, P., & Raubal, M. (2021). Improving resilience by communicating predicted disruptions in control rooms, INTERACT 2021.

Abstract: Even though the importance of resilience for control rooms is generally acknowledged, cognitive resilience is often not taken into account properly during control room design. This vision paper aims at improving the cognitive resilience in control rooms through advancements in three key research areas: 1) automated detection of upcoming disruptions, 2) visualization of spatio-temporal uncertainty, 3) cognition-aware interaction design.